PROCTOR PISTOL PROCESS – “THE FUNDAMENTALS OF FAST” with Frank Proctor

SHOOTING is my PASSION and PROFESSION, I have been shooting or training almost everyday for the past 15 years. I have been a USPSA Grandmaster for the the past 10 years and served 15 years in the US Army Special Forces (full bio on website) In this course I offer my thoughts, information, experience  and ABILITIES to help you become the best shooter you want to be.  My goal is to teach you the way and give you an understanding of how to perform, and how to train to perform better…always better, Faster, more Accurate, Easier…

( -> register on the Frank Proctor Shooting Website <- )

The Proctor Shooting Process involves an in-depth understanding and mastery of the following 5 “Fundamentals of Fast” in order to shoot Fast, Accurate, Easy

These concepts apply to WINNING in Competition, Combat or Recreational Shooting.

PROCESSING

Shooting is VISUAL. Processing is the most important component and all the others are there to support the Processing. Visual information must come in through the eyes and be processed by the mind so that it can provide the best output.

CONTROL

Recoil and trigger control. Recoil control is important to give the eyes the correct relationship of rear sight, front sight and target. Sights and triggers are the core fundamentals of marksmanship.  Trigger control is important to put the least amount of movement into the gun possible for a variety of scoring speeds.

MECHANICS

Mechanics are the things required to get the gun in front of the eyes so that the mind can process information to provide output.  Mechanics such as draws, reload, malfunction, clearance, etc., should be efficiently done with fluid and repeatable hand speed in order to support the Processing and Mindset.

MOVEMENT

The practical applications or shooting require movement.  It should be done the most efficient way possible to get the shooter from point A to point B so that they are in the best position possible to shoot and or to shoot effectively while covering ground.

MENTAL CONTROL

Shooters must remain calm and allow the visual information to come in so that the mind can process the information and provide the best output.  We must maintain the mental control and visual discipline necessary to SEE what we need to SEE and LETITDO!

( -> register on the Frank Proctor Shooting Website <- )

Instructor Bio

I served over 20 years in the military and the last 16 of those in the US Army Special Forces.  In 2004 I attended SFAUC- Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course.  I knew then that being a better shooter would be a life long passion.  In between deployments and other duties at Group I was and assistant instructor for Combat Marksmanship, CQB, Breaching and the Sniper program.  I later became the NCOIC for the Sniper program and Primary instructor for Combat Marksmanship.  During that time I had the privilege to serve with and learn from some great dudes.

In May 2007 I started competitive shooting and found out what I didn’t know about shooting!  I started shooting a match almost every weekend and when I failed at something I would work on it during the week so I could see an improvement the next weekend.  I joined a range and trained almost everyday sometimes 2 times a day.  In January of 2009 I achieved the rank of Grand Master in USPSA Limited division.  I was the 4th ranked Limited GM in the world at that time, but still made some mental mistakes in matches.  I was shooting at my peak in the summer of 2009 and started gearing up for another deployment.  In 2012 I started my training company full time. Most of what I have learned about shooting has come to me since then.  Something happened and I took a much more analytical approach to training and shooting instead of the classic just go do it 10,000 times.  Looking back to 2009 when I was at my peak as a shooter I didn’t fully understand what was happening or really how to show other people how to do it.  I still don’t know everything about shooting and I don’t think anybody knows everything about anything.  I believe in having an explorative mind to continue to look for more information to make us better shooters.  My current training programs take an easy but in-depth, cerebral approach to becoming a better shooter.

I courses all over the USA (some international) as well as at my private training facility near Talladega, AL. My facility features 11 pistol bays with over 100 AR 500 steel targets.  I have 3 dedicated rifle ranges out to 650 yards covered in steel targets. The rifle ranges offer natural terrain such as trees, boulders and vehicles to shoot from.  Having this many ranges available allows shooters to get more challenging and effective reps in a shorter amount of time in order to hone the skills to win in any environment. I also have a pro shop on site with all the guns, gear and accessories that I use.

Since childhood I have been mechanically inclined to find solutions.  My first job in the Army was a Light Wheeled Vehicle Mechanic and that was my civilian career for about 5 years afterwards as well.  I enjoyed the diagnostic and problem solving aspects of being a mechanic.  When I received a vehicle with a problem I found it easier to diagnose the problem if I had a full understanding of how things were supposed to work.  When I became a shooter I definitely brought that aptitude with me.  When I use guns and gear my mind looks for a better and easier way to get things done.

Thanks for reading this and I hope it provides you with some insight into why I do the things I do.

Bring what YOU need to shoot and take care of your body during an active and fast paced day on a range outdoors:

- Pistol G19 sized or full-sized pistol

– Minimum 3 magazines, minimum 2 mag pouches (5 pistol mags and 4 pistol mag pouches recommended)

- Kydex or Injection molded Holster, OWB preferred, IWB is also acceptable

- NO LEATHER OR NYLON HOLSTERS

- 1000 rounds Pistol ammo (minimum)

- Personal IFAK kit & Tourniquet

- Ear and eye protection

- Lubrication/cleaning kit

- Comfortable clothing and closed toed shoes for strenuous activity

- Food and Beverage

- Note taking material

- Rain gear and sunscreen (depending on weather)

 

* Please note that the range has no facilities / running water etc (they do have porta potties), so please bring plenty of water and anything else you might need throughout the days.

Sign up through Frank's website (links in description above)

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